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Lesson Plans

This category contains 17 posts

Digital Storytelling in First-Year Composition

I can vividly recall stumbling across “The World of Digital Storytelling” by Jason Ohler in late 2008. I was on winter break and I was looking for an innovative way to teach a personal narrative assignment to my soon-to-be first-year composition students. To be sure, I taught personal narrative assignments many different ways during many … Continue reading

My On-again, Off-again Love Affair with Collaborative Writing Projects

Collaborative writing projects are a very great good, and I will continue to assign them. Collaborative writing projects are problematic and I consider cutting them from my course plans every semester. From Kenneth Bruffee to Ira Shor, pedagogical theorists have maintained not only the value of student collaboration, but the necessity of it. Knowledge is … Continue reading

We’ve Always Taught Technology in Composition!

Joe Torok is a PhD candidate in Rhetoric and Composition as well as a Lecturer in the English Department at Wayne State University. He teaches Basic Writing and Technical Communication and has been instrumental in helping the department significantly expand the number of its online course offerings.   I don’t often see technology in scare quotes, but … Continue reading

Teaching the Rhetorical Situation

I use this helpful poster from CCC to define and discuss “rhetorical situation” with Basic Writing (ENG 1010) students. In particular, we make liberal use of the diagram below (from the poster) by (a) fleshing out each of the words represented and (b) plugging multiple examples into the diagram to see how it pans out. With regard to … Continue reading

How did IT get here? Part II: Strategies for Supporting Students’ Development of Metacognitive Inscription

    This is the second post of a two-part series written by Adrienne Jankens, Angela Meador, and Thomas Trimble on metacognition’s role in the WSU Composition sequence.   In our previous post, we provided an overview of the theoretical and pedagogical context behind the Composition Program’s interest in metacognitive awareness and reflection. The core argument … Continue reading

Piloting the New 1020, Part V: Teaching and Learning about Discourse and Discourse Communities in the Inquiry-Based Classroom

Note: This it the fifth in a series of blog posts chronicling the piloting of the new ENG 1020 Curriculum. You can find all entries in the series here. Each of us teaching pilot sections of ENG 1020 has our own angle to the course. While we have agreed on several components of the course … Continue reading

Style in Rhetorical Analysis

It was one of those weekends that befall every composition instructor. A weekend of grading final drafts. Maybe you have a settling in routine—or maybe you don’t. Sometimes I fluff and rearrange pillows and grade in bed, or grab a blanket and read at my dinner table. Perhaps you’re a coffee house grader, or a … Continue reading

Inventing the Reflective Assignment in English 3010

This is my second semester teaching a pilot section of Eng 3010, but my first teaching the newly designed reflective component of this course. For those of you that are less familiar with the pilot project, there are six instructors involved in the study. The instructors are split into pairs to test the value of … Continue reading

Rinse and Repeat as Needed

My 1020 class just wrapped up project three, the definition essay. This past week I rolled out the final project, an evaluation/proposal essay that is designed to explore the future of work. With the outside temperature hovering close to 80 degrees and climate change in the air, I decided to push the metaphor of the … Continue reading

Teaching the Macro Rules of Academic Argument: A Hybrid Template

When I first encountered Graff and Birkenstein’s They Say/I Say, I was skeptical of the use of templates. My skepticism, however, had no foundation other than the fact that I didn’t know how to incorporate them into the classroom. To this day, I still have a difficult time introducing students to the vast number of … Continue reading