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Discourse communities

This category contains 5 posts

Recharging, Reflecting, and Revising: My Conference Weekend

Amy Metcalf and I just got back from a trip to East Lansing for MCTE and WIDE-EMU, where we talked about our projects on self-efficacy (Amy) and the inquiry environment (me). Now that I am home, in my dissertation sweatpants, in my chair, about to eat some pizza, I want to take a few minutes … Continue reading

Double Consciousness, Discourse Communities & Civic Learning: Using Analytical Writing to Foresee a Better Detroit

Panoramic windows and twinkling jutes of mesmeric glimmers from the high rises and skyscrapers greet the gloomy darkness and give a hopeful, hazy feeling, like an alcoholic induced delirium. There is an uncanny quietness to each morning, today a neighbor is playing Frank Sinatra—I’m here in Detroit. Recently I let go of my comfortable Harrison … Continue reading

Piloting the New 1020, Part V: Teaching and Learning about Discourse and Discourse Communities in the Inquiry-Based Classroom

Note: This it the fifth in a series of blog posts chronicling the piloting of the new ENG 1020 Curriculum. You can find all entries in the series here. Each of us teaching pilot sections of ENG 1020 has our own angle to the course. While we have agreed on several components of the course … Continue reading

Piloting the New 1020, Part IV: A Focus on Detroit and the Politics of Discourse Communities

Note: This it the fourth in a series of blog posts chronicling the piloting of the new ENG 1020 Curriculum. You can find all entries in the series here. When Jeff Pruchnic detailed how challenging adopting a new curriculum was given how tightly he wanted to hold on to old assignments that were natural, familiar … Continue reading

Establishing Student Writing Communities using The *Writing About Writing* Curriculum

“Necessity is still the matter of invention,” says Al Manners (a character in Alice Childress’s play Trouble in Mind). Helping composition students find the content and context by which necessity might invent some meaningful argument or analysis can be somewhat of a tricky task. Especially for students who enter our classrooms with attitudes about writing, … Continue reading